Stanford University
France-Stanford Center team

Mission & History

The France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, founded in partnership with the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, aims to bridge the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, sciences, engineering, business and law, addressing historical and contemporary issues of significance for France and the United States from a broad range of perspectives.

The center brings faculty and students from across Stanford’s departments and schools together and into contact with colleagues in France, to explore issues of common intellectual concern, to advance collaborative research, and to foster interdisciplinary inquiry.

The aim of the center is to develop interdisciplinary conversations and build long-term networks of cooperation between Stanford and France. It is part of the Stanford Global Studies Division in the School of Humanities and Sciences.

To date, the center has been focusing on four initiatives:

  • Conferences exploring significant issues for our two societies, especially those where there are divergent French and American approaches to these issues.

  • Seed funding for collaborative projects between Stanford and French researchers, especially those that encourage multidisciplinary approaches in research, hold promise for longer-term cooperation, and benefit younger researchers.

  • Fellowships for undergraduate, graduate students and junior scholars.

  • Visits and exchanges of faculty, researchers, and students.

The France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies was created in 2002 at the initiative of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Stanford University. It was officially inaugurated in November 2003.

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Funding

View funding opportunities offered by the France Stanford Center.

Resources

View our list of partner institutions in France as well as related funding opportunities.

15th Anniversary

In 2018, the France-Stanford Center celebrated 15 years of fostering collaborative research between French and U.S. scholars.