Global 1968 in 2018

The 50th anniversary of May 1968 rings particularly sharply in the U.S. and Europe this year, as contemporary political and social actors consider ways to shake up political institutions or ideologies. This international and interdisciplinary conference, presented by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages (DLCL), will bring scholars from Stanford and other U.S. and European universities for the first time to discuss the intellectual, political, social, sexual and artistic history of these seismic events. All attendees are invited to participate in the discussion. 

1968 to 2018: Remembering and Imagining Revolutionary Struggle with Angela Davis

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages (DLCL) presents an evening of conversation with scholar-activist Angela Davis. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Global 1968, this intergenerational interview is designed to help us reflect on historical and contemporary activism and community organizing. Angela Davis will be sharing her own experiences fighting for social justice and discussing how we all can contribute to this work in our present historical moment. Angela Davis will answer questions from Stanford English Professor Michele Elam, Stanford alumna Gabriella I.

Muslims of France: Film Screening

Documentary Screening and Conversation with Director Karim Miské


Thursday February 8
5:30-7:30pm
Episode 1: Indigènes 1904 -1945
Episode 2: Immigrants 1945 -1981

Tuesday February 13
5:30pm-7:30pm
Episode 3: French 1981 -2009
Conversation with director Karim Miské and Professor Cécile Alduy

Film Screening: Muslims of France (Episode I and II)

Episode 1: Indigènes 1904 - 1945
Episode 2: Immigrants 1945 - 1981
Episode 3: French 1981 - 2009

Karim Miské reopens France's history books to look back at the 20th century as lived by Muslims. The film unfolds chronologically, piecing together the memories and cultural identity of this French minority. In our collective representations, Muslims are the embodiment of the "other," the "stranger."

Muslims of France: Discussion with Karim Miské

Documentary Screening and Conversation with Director Karim Miské


Thursday February 8
5:30-7:30pm
Episode 1: Indigènes 1904 -1945
Episode 2: Immigrants 1945 -1981

Tuesday February 13
5:30pm-7:30pm
Episode 3: French 1981 -2009
Conversation with director Karim Miské and Professor Cécile Alduy

Making the World Nuclear After Hiroshima

How did the world experience and respond to the 1945 atomic bombings? What did Hiroshima come to symbolize for the global policy frameworks of nuclear technology? How was the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki reconciled with the later development of nuclear weapons? With “Atoms for Peace”? What did we learn about the impact of radiation on human health and the environment, and what role did such knowledge play in the making of the nuclear world?

Making the World Nuclear After Hiroshima

How did the world experience and respond to the 1945 atomic bombings? What did Hiroshima come to symbolize for the global policy frameworks of nuclear technology? How was the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki reconciled with the later development of nuclear weapons? With “Atoms for Peace”? What did we learn about the impact of radiation on human health and the environment, and what role did such knowledge play in the making of the nuclear world?

Labor, Coercion, and Rights in Africa and the Indian Ocean World in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Labor coercion was a central feature of social and economic life in Africa and the IOW in the 19th and 20th centuries.   It persists to this day. Such coercion took many forms in different parts of these regions and changed over time. The core question we want to address in these workshops is why did people in so many different economic, political, social, and cultural setting turn to coercion to organize labor? Why did coercion persist so long in so many different contexts? How has coercion changed over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries?

Labor, Coercion, and Rights in Africa and the Indian Ocean World in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Labor coercion was a central feature of social and economic life in Africa and the IOW in the 19th and 20th centuries.   It persists to this day. Such coercion took many forms in different parts of these regions and changed over time. The core question we want to address in these workshops is why did people in so many different economic, political, social, and cultural setting turn to coercion to organize labor? Why did coercion persist so long in so many different contexts? How has coercion changed over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries?