Global 1968 in 2018

The 50th anniversary of May 1968 rings particularly sharply in the U.S. and Europe this year, as contemporary political and social actors consider ways to shake up political institutions or ideologies. This international and interdisciplinary conference, presented by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages (DLCL), will bring scholars from Stanford and other U.S. and European universities for the first time to discuss the intellectual, political, social, sexual and artistic history of these seismic events. All attendees are invited to participate in the discussion. 

1968 to 2018: Remembering and Imagining Revolutionary Struggle with Angela Davis

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages (DLCL) presents an evening of conversation with scholar-activist Angela Davis. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Global 1968, this intergenerational interview is designed to help us reflect on historical and contemporary activism and community organizing. Angela Davis will be sharing her own experiences fighting for social justice and discussing how we all can contribute to this work in our present historical moment. Angela Davis will answer questions from Stanford English Professor Michele Elam, Stanford alumna Gabriella I.

Making the World Nuclear After Hiroshima

How did the world experience and respond to the 1945 atomic bombings? What did Hiroshima come to symbolize for the global policy frameworks of nuclear technology? How was the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki reconciled with the later development of nuclear weapons? With “Atoms for Peace”? What did we learn about the impact of radiation on human health and the environment, and what role did such knowledge play in the making of the nuclear world?

Making the World Nuclear After Hiroshima

How did the world experience and respond to the 1945 atomic bombings? What did Hiroshima come to symbolize for the global policy frameworks of nuclear technology? How was the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki reconciled with the later development of nuclear weapons? With “Atoms for Peace”? What did we learn about the impact of radiation on human health and the environment, and what role did such knowledge play in the making of the nuclear world?

DocuMentality: New Approaches to Written Documents in Imperial Life and Literature

The participants in our conference are approaching ancient documents and documentary practices from diverse periods, textual corpora, and methodological perspectives. In order to foster collaboration and dialogue between these very different projects, our conference organizers propose some key questions that our participants may wish to take into consideration.

Save the Date: Heritage Bureaucracies: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives (Day 1)

This is Day 1 of a 2-day conference that aims to further our understanding of the institutional cultures, funding schemes and power structures underlying transnational institutions, with a particular focus on heritage bureaucracies.

Film Screening: "The Battle of Algiers"

This is the third of eight films in the annual SGS Summer Film Festival running from June 17th to August 26th.  This year's festival features films from around the world that focus on the topic of “Imagining Empire: A Global Retrospective” and offers a flexible lens with which to look at both historical and contemporary geopolitical and socioeconomic contexts.

Film synopsis: In the 1950s, fear and violence escalate as the people of Algiers fight for independence from the French government.